Tag Archives: Glacier National Park

ADDING TOUR OPTIONS TO YOUR GLACIER NATIONAL PARK ITINERARY

As tour operators plan for their next warm-weather tour into Western Montana’s Glacier Country, we’ve highlighted a few tour options that tend to fly under the radar. When visiting Western Montana, we know that Glacier National Park is a bucket list destination, and most visitors coming to Glacier Country have at least a couple days planned to see the sights in the Crown of the Continent. If your itinerary allows, we’ve included a few more options in the Flathead Valley that can be added to any itinerary, especially for the less active or senior motorcoach tour.

Climb aboard a red bus in Glacier National Park.

Purple Mountain Lavender
Tour the grounds of Purple Mountain Lavender just above Flathead Lake in Lakeside, Montana, featuring more than 1,000 lavender plants of 25 different varieties all grown in a chemical-free environment. Take in the breathtaking views of the Flathead Valley and learn about all the different uses for lavender—from oil distillation and cooking, to drying for arrangements. If your itinerary schedule is tight and you’d rather have a class brought to your group, they are available at your hotel location and are great fun for men and woman alike. Deb—the owner—will introduce you to lavender cookies, lemonade and show you how to make lavender sachets so you can take some Montana lavender home with you.
May – October

The views of Flathead Lake from Purple Mountain Lavender.

Walk the lavender fields with 25 different varieties.

Meet Humphrey, Sunshine and Flopsey.

Making lavender sachets to take home.

Kalispell Historic & Cultural Tour
Kalispell Montana is the county seat for the Flathead Valley and has some amazing history just waiting to be explored. Whether you request a step-on guide to board your motorcoach and make your way around Kalispell or you climb aboard a historic trolley for a customized tour, your group is in for a treat. Your guide will help lay out the history of downtown Kalispell and its historic homes and tell the story of the famous people who resided in them. Learn about the founder of Kalispell, William Conrad, and visit the Conrad Mansion Museum built in 1895. The mansion was quite innovative for its time, with a built-in dumbwaiter, fire hoses on every floor and a communication system throughout the house. Take a docent-led tour and learn about the dignitaries who stayed with the Conrad’s over the years. Visit the Hockaday Museum of Art—an original Carnegie Library—a beautiful gallery housing one of the largest collections of art and culture on the Blackfeet Indians and Glacier National Park. Originally built as a schoolhouse, The Museum of Central School in now the home of NW Montana exhibitions and delves into the railroad and logging history of the area.
May – November including a tour of Conrad Mansion

Explore the Conrad Mansion Museum and grounds.

The Hockaday Museum of Art was once a Carnegie Library.

Board a historic trolley for a unique view of Historic Kalispell.

Far West Boat Tours on Flathead Lake
Flathead Lake is the largest freshwater lake in the western United States, capturing the title from Lake Tahoe by a few miles of shoreline. What better way to see this beautiful lake and the magnificent Mission and Swan Mountain ranges than by boat. Book a charter for your group or take advantage of the summer schedule when the boat sets sail daily at 1 p.m. from the dock at the Lakeside Marina on the northeast side of the lake. The daily cruise is narrated by the Far West crew who will explain how the natural lake was carved out by glaciers and that is rated the cleanest lake in the U.S. Plus, they’ll tell you what kind of water species call the lake home. Cruise past the natural islands in the lake, the largest being Wild Horse Island—now a day-use state park—and witness where the Flathead Indians were reported to have pastured their horses to keep them from be stolen by other tribes. There are still a few wild horses on Wild Horse Island, along with bighorn sheep, mule deer and bald eagles. There is a 10% discount for groups over 10 on their daily cruises. For groups wishing to charter the boat, a fully-licensed bar is available and catering services can be arranged.
June – October

Learn about Flathead Lake from the deck of Far West Boat Tours.

Sunset cruise on Flathead Lake.

For more information on additional itinerary suggestions, where to stay, and where to find group-friendly restaurants, visit our tour operators page, or drop me a line. I’m always here to help.

DP

 

TOP 10 PLACES TO VISIT THIS FALL IN WESTERN MONTANA

Many visitors to Western Montana’s Glacier Country arrive in July and August, but I’d like to let you in on a little secret that you can share with your FIT/Group clients: fall is one of the best times to visit Montana. The changing colors of vibrant red and orange hues are breathtaking. The weather can have a flair for the dramatic, with bright blue skies one minute and snow the next, but that is what makes autumn in Montana uniquely pleasing. We’ve rounded up some of the top things to add to a fall itinerary under Western Montana’s big blue sky.

The view of Swiftcurrent Lake from Many Glacier Hotel.

Top 10 List:

  1. Glacier National Park – The Crown of the Continent encompasses more than 1 million acres and features the famous Going-to-the-Sun Road. Pro tip: boat cruises and hiking trails on the east side of the park, are less crowded and lead to stunning views.

    A red bus in Glacier National Park.

  2. Blackfeet Indian Reservation – Visit the Museum of the Plains Indian and the Blackfeet Heritage Center & Art Gallery to learn about Blackfeet culture and traditions.

    Statue of a Blackfeet warrior.

  3. Whitefish – This resort town offers fine dining, boutiques and breweries. An easy 15-minute drive to Whitefish Mountain Resort offers weekend activities on the mountain until the end of September.

    The Aerial Adventure Park at Whitefish Mountain Resort.

  4. Kalispell – Make Kalispell your home base for your Western Montana adventure, and explore this charming town’s museums and galleries. Flathead Lake is just a 10-minute drive away and it’s only 30 minutes to Glacier National Park.

    Montana Trolley ride in historic Kalispell.

  5. Flathead Lake – The largest natural freshwater lake in the West is home to ample water-sport activities, boat cruises and six state parks, including Wild Horse Island, which can only be accessed by boat.

    Sunset view of Flathead Lake

  6. Flathead Indian Reservation – Experience the traditions of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes at the People’s Center in Pablo.

    Cultural dancing at Ninepipes Lodge.

  7. National Bison Range – This 18,500-acre preserve is home to 350 head of bison, plus elk, antelope, bighorn sheep, deer, black bear and coyote.

    Bison roam the National Bison Range.

  8. Missoula – Home to the University of Montana and known as Montana’s cultural hub, Missoula is full of shopping, dining, breweries and distilleries, and offers Montana’s finest music scene.

    Hikers are able to hike the “M” trail and oversee all of Missoula.

  9. Seely Swan Valley – Considered one of the state’s most scenic drives and an outdoor lover’s haven, the Seeley Swan Valley offers lakes, trails, mountains and state parks. The perfect place to watch the western larch trees (also known as tamaracks) turn the forests and hillsides a vibrant gold.

    Tamarack trees in autumn.

  10. Bitterroot Valley – Discover history at the St. Mary’s Mission in Stevensville and Daly Mansion and Margaret Daly Memorial Arboretum in Hamilton. Chose to hike from over 100 trailheads or bike the 50-mile-long paved Bitterroot Trail.

    Once the summer home of Marcus Daly, now the Daly Mansion Museum.

For more information on where to stay throughout Western Montana, visit our tour operators website. If you need additional tour itinerary assistance, feel free to drop me a line; I’m always here to help.

 

Happy fall!

DP

MEET IN MONTANA – A MEETING PLANNER FAM TRIP

We all know that the best—and quite frankly the only way—to really know if a destination is right for your next meeting, conference or corporate retreat is to experience it firsthand. With that in mind, the first week of June, Western Montana’s Glacier Country invited four professional meeting planners from around the U.S. to Montana for a familiarization (FAM) tour to visit our three anchor cities of Missoula, Kalispell and Whitefish, where we showcased meeting facilities, off-site venues, farm-to-fork offerings and authentic Montana experiences that seemed custom-made for meetings.

After flying into Missoula International Airport (MSO) the group took a scenic 30-minute drive to The Resort at Paws Up an authentic working cattle ranch and one of Western Montana’s luxury guest ranches. The ranch has varying accommodations from lavish guest homes to riverside glamping tents that include a camp butler who’s dedicated to your group’s needs. The glamping tents were a hit with the planners and we took a few minutes to relax around the fire along the Blackfoot River—one of Montana’s premiere blue-ribbon fly-fishing trout streams.

Relaxing around the campfire at Paws Up.

After the site tour we returned to Missoula, Montana’s second-largest city and cultural hub—and met up with Mimi Hall Gustafson from Destination Missoula—the official convention and visitors bureau—and took a short walk along the Clark Fork River to Caras Park to watch river surfers on Brennan’s Wave. After tasting and touring Montgomery Distillery we ventured to one of downtown Missoula’s premiere restaurants, Plonk Wine Bar, where we dined in the elegant wine cellar. We had a restful night’s sleep at the Holiday Inn Missoula Downtown, (featuring 200 guest rooms and 15,000 sq. feet of meeting space) considered one of Missoula’s leading convention hotels. The next day started with a site tour and breakfast at DoubleTree by Hilton Missoula Edgewater (featuring 171 guest rooms and nearly 9,000 square feet of meeting space) before visiting some of Missoula’s meeting and event spaces including The Wilma Theater, Missoula College and the unique and expansive meeting space at the University of Montana followed by lunch overlooking the U of M Grizzlies stadium.

Colorful drinks from Montgomery Distillery.

The view from the Canyon Club overlooking University of Montana’s stadium.

The drive from Missoula to Bigfork north on Highway 93 happens to yield some of the most scenic vistas in Montana, including the National Bison Range and the Mission Mountain Range. With Montana’s spring wildflowers on full display, the drive through the Jocko and Mission valleys was stunning.

Our next stop on the FAM tour was an overnight at Averill’s Flathead Lake Lodge. Family owned and operated for over 65 years, the 2,000-acre resort sits on the east shore of Flathead Lake—the largest freshwater lake in the West—where it offers both horse and water recreation, as well as accommodations that vary from small cabins to rustic lodges and 5,000 square feet of meeting space. While the resort hosts families for week-long vacations from mid-June through Labor Day, it can be reserved for groups the months of May, early June, September and October making it the ultimate spring or fall retreat destination.

Tour of Flathead Lake Lodge.

Fun ride home from Steak Fry via an old fire truck.

After a hearty ranch breakfast, we meet up with Dawn Jackson from Discover Kalispell—the Kalispell Convention & Visitors Bureau. After several site tours we ventured out to Purple Mountain Lavender, and owner Deb took us on a tour of her farm where she grows, cultivates, drys and manufactures everything lavender from sachets to lavender lemonade and shortbread cookies. The afternoon took us to downtown Kalispell and a lunch dine-around featuring DeSoto Grille, 406 Grill and Slit Rock Café. After some down time the planners enjoyed an insightful historical tour on the Montana Trolley, a service that’s used to transport groups on specialty tours and events throughout the Flathead Valley. The trolley dropped us at the Conrad Mansion—once the home to Kalispell’s founder, Charles Conrad—for a tour and delicious dinner served on the mansion lawn, the perfect setting for off-site receptions.

Group or spouse outings to Purple Mountain Lavender.

Beautiful dinner at the Conrad Mansion in Kalispell.

Our overnight accommodations were at the conveniently located Red Lion Kalispell in the heart of downtown Kalispell (featuring 170 guest rooms and 12,000 square feet of flexible meeting space).

Our final destination was the charming mountain town of Whitefish where we were greeted by Dan Hansen with Explore Whitefish—the Whitefish Convention and Visitors Bureau. Our first stop was to visit the newest boutique property in downtown Whitefish—The Firebrand Hotel (featuring 86 guest rooms, a small meeting room and board room). We headed up to Big Mountain and stopped in at Whitefish Mountain Resort and lodging options including the option to buy out the mountainside Kandahar Lodge for groups of 10 to 50 in the spring and fall months. We had lunch at Casey’s in downtown and enjoyed the rooftop lounge and the beautiful views of the mountains and valley.

Next on the itinerary and a highlight for the planners was a visit to Glacier National Park. Upon entering the park, we stopped for a photo at the Glacier Park sign, then continued on to Lake McDonald Lodge were we embarked on a boat cruise with Glacier Park Boat Company aboard the DeSmet on Lake McDonald. It was a perfect afternoon in Glacier National Park.

Welcome to Glacier National Park, ladies and gentlemen.

Having some fun on the DeSmet on Lake McDonald in Glacier National Park.

Our final evening was spent touring Grouse Mountain Lodge and dining at one of the local favorites, Abruzzo Italian Kitchen one of Whitefishes newest additions before heading to The Lodge at Whitefish Lake (featuring 101 guest rooms and 10,000+ square feet of meeting space) on the shore of Whitefish Lake for a restful night’s sleep.

Good morning from The Lodge at Whitefish Lake.

After a delightful breakfast, the planners departed Glacier Park International (FCA) (a 15-minute drive from downtown Whitefish) for home.

It was an action-packed week full of great food, fantastic venues, fun activities and lots of learning about Western Montana’s meeting options.

If you would like more information about Western Montana’s Glacier Country as a meetings destination (feel free to check out our week at #MeetInMontana on instagram or if you are interested in participating in the next meeting planner FAM highlighting our three anchor cities of Missoula, Kalispell and Whitefish, drop me an email here.

Meet me in Montana,

DP

MOTORCYLE TOURING IN WESTERN MONTANA’S GLACIER COUNTRY

Motorcycle touring around the Western United States is becoming increasingly popular. Home to uncrowded byways, back-roads galore and more scenic beauty than you can imagine, Western Montana’s Glacier Country is prime motorcycle riding country. Traveling along our open roads gives bikers the experience to see untouched beauty, breathe in fresh mountain air and explore our charming small towns along the way.

Open roads of Montana beckon.

If you are looking for the most stunning ride of your life, traveling on the Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park is a must. This 50-mile-long road takes riders through the heart of the park, driving through glacial-carved terrain, jagged peaks and pristine wilderness and crests the Continental Divide at Logan Pass.

Ride alongside the historic red buses in Glacier National Park.

Other off-the-beaten-path rides include the Lake Koocanusa Scenic Byway, one of the most scenic wild roads in northwest Montana. This scenic byway travels around the west side of the lake and is heavily forested terrain with an abundance of wildlife.

Scenic byways along the water are perfect touring roads.

Another favorite motorcycle route is the State Route 35, along the east shore of Flathead Lake. This scenic route offers riders breathtaking scenery, roadside fruit stands (try the locally grown Flathead cherries, they are to die for) and some spectacular riding.

Gearing up at Grizzly Harley-Davidson in Missoula.

We’ve got you covered if you’re looking for the perfect Montana motorcycle tour, or give us a shout, we’re always here to help or look here for more inspirations.  Grab your bike or rent one from one of or dealers and head out into Western Montana for the ride of your life-you won’t be disappointed.

Happy Riding,
NG

GUEST POST: 5 GREAT PLACES TO EXPLORE MONTANA BY BICYCLE

Western Montana’s Glacier Country has seen an increase in unique and niche markets that love the open roads, stunning scenery and local hospitality. Cycling is definitely one of them. If you are a tour operator offering cycling adventures we’ve asked the experts and our friends from Adventure Cycling Association, located right here in Missoula Montana, to share their top 5 destinations in Montana for adventure cycling.

Bikers enjoy the Bitterroot Mountains.

The Adventure Cycling Association’s route network has 3,500 miles of mapped bicycle routes in Montana, and more than 42,000 around the country. We encourage you to explore Montana by bicycle, where you can take in the smells, sights, locals, communities and culture at a pace that allows you to appreciate all Montana has to offer.

TransAmerica Bicycle Trail
With the incomparable Madison Range as a backdrop, cyclists explore the backroads, farmers markets and small towns of Big Sky Country using pedal power alone.

To purchase maps, digital data and route highlights, click here.

Northern Tier Route
A trio of riders explores a wild and remote section of the Northern Tier Bicycle Route from Libby to Whitefish.

To purchase maps, digital data and route highlights, click here. 

Lewis & Clark Bicycle Trail
Thousands of cyclists travel in the footsteps of Lewis and Clark every year. Here’s a small piece of that route, featuring the stunning plateaus and winding river bottoms of north-central Montana.

The Lewis & Clark Bicycle Trail was created to celebrate the anniversary of the Corps of Discovery’s 1804 – 1806 historic journey and offers cyclists the opportunity to follow the path of the intrepid explorers, captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. It includes seven map sections detailing the 1804 – 1805 westbound trip, roughly following the Missouri and Columbia rivers, and one map section showing Clark’s 1806 eastbound return along the Yellowstone River in Montana, totaling 3,562.5 miles.

To purchase maps, digital data and route highlights, click here.

Great Divide Mountain Bike Route
Crisscrossing the Continental Divide from Canada to Mexico, Adventure Cycling’s Great Divide Mountain Bike Route is the longest mapped off-pavement cycling route in the world. Along its 2,768-mile course, it cuts through some of Montana’s most wild and spectacular country. See it here through the eyes of two young travelers from faraway lands.

There is an excellent opportunity to view wildlife such as bear, deer, wild horses, pronghorn antelope, eagles, osprey, sandhill cranes and other animals and birds. The route is rich in history, with ghost towns, deserted mines, wagon routes and old Spanish land grants, and is near or passes through several national parks, including Glacier, Yellowstone and Grand Teton.

To purchase maps, digital data and route highlights, click here.

Adventure Cycling Headquarters
Every summer we enjoy the parade of bicycle travelers who drop by our office here in Missoula, Montana. These cyclists come from all over the world. Last year we had over 1,400 visitors! Their variety of style, equipment, route and purpose is endless. In 1982, Greg Siple began recording our visitors on film and asking them to tell their stories, creating Adventure Cycling’s National Bicycle Touring Portrait Collection. The Open Road Gallery features selections from this collection in Adventure Cyclist magazine and on our website.

We invite you to visit the Adventure Cycling HQ, meet the staff, take a free tour, grab an ice cream from the visiting cyclists’ lounge and check out some of the portraits hanging on the walls that are featured in our Open Road Gallery collection.

Lisa McKinney is Adventure Cycling’s communications director.

GUEST POST: MONTANA’S NOT-SO-OFF SEASON

5 Reasons to Schedule Your Next Meeting in Western Montana’s Glacier Country

Ah, the spring melt! One day the snow drifts are so high we are unsure if spring will ever arrive, and the next day we are sad to see it melting so fast, and we’re left wanting for more turns on the ski hill. The changing of the seasons is something we Montanans often take for granted. It’s one of those things that just sort of happens. When I moved to San Francisco in my mid-twenties, I was so excited to experience the city, even though I knew I would miss the mountains of my hometown, Missoula. To my surprise, it wasn’t the mountains I missed the most, but the four distinct seasons.

Spring sunset over Missoula

I will admit, for the individual traveler, a Montana  summer with warm nights and daylight hanging on until well after 10 p.m., and a winter with epic vertical and no lift lines are both too enticing. However, as a meeting planner and destination professional, I realize Montana’s “off” seasons or what we refer to as shoulder season (spring and fall) are not only spectacular, but perfectly aligned with the desired months for conferences and meetings.  Determined to avoid the travel-heavy summer months and the winter holiday chaos, annual meeting and conference planners often schedule events in spring, early summer and fall. As a self-described Treasure State expert and longtime resident, I’d argue there are no better times to host your event in Western Montana than during these seemingly “off” months. Here are five reasons why:

The Vistas Are Always There
Montana is beautiful year-round. Many locals will refer to this time of year as mud season. Sure, the need for a car wash is real, but the peaks of Glacier National Park are still spectacular and the sunsets on Whitefish Lake are still postcard perfect. Even an early fall thunderstorm rolling across Flathead Lake will take your breath away. The scenery never gets old and never disappoints—that, I  can guarantee. Often we hear that the panoramic views and clear mountain air serve as inspiration for quality discussions and out-of-the-box thinking. Clear skies or not, Montana seems to spark creativity and innovation.

A picture perfect day at Saint Mary Lake in Glacier National Park.

So Much to Do
My expertise is in Western Montana’s Glacier Country (as it’s called), so I will focus there. Imagine you have a half day to wow conference attendees with an array of activities. You’d love to consider Montana because, let’s face it, you’ve heard so many awesome things, but your conference is in late March. Surely, you think, that’s too early for Montana. Think again. Even in Western Montana, spring will start to show in late February. The days are getting longer and the nights are not as cold. This often results in bluebird days with spring emerging in town, but winter lingering in the mountains—a beautiful contrast. By late March, your list of potential activities could include hiking to the “M” overlooking Missoula, world-class spring skiing at Whitefish Mountain Resort, fly-fishing on the Blackfoot River (think A River Runs Through It), snowmobiling to Garnet Ghost Town, wildlife viewing at the National Bison Range, or snowshoeing in Glacier National Park (local secret: Glacier National Park has no crowds in the spring, fall and winter, but these are some of the most magical times to visit). Where else can you find this many diverse outdoor activities in late March? Heck, if you are up for it, you could raft the whitewater of the Lochsa River (full wetsuits, of course).

Antelope roam the National Bison Range north of Missoula.

We’ve Got You Covered
Event planners live and die by their backup plans. Montanans are no different, as being prepared is a way of life. We’ll move that trail ride inside for an arena ride, if lightning threatens. Is snow forecasted during your rafting trip? We’ll gear you up or offer a lake cruise in a heated tour boat instead. It’s raining on the ski hill—let’s do a local distillery or creamery tour instead. We’re flexible folks and, while we love being outdoors, the indoor activity options are truly endless and truly Montana. Country jitterbug lessons, anyone?

Under Budget
Many venues that are too expensive or too booked “in season” may be discounted and available.  Imagine treating your attendees to a Montana dude ranch or luxury lodge. The discounts don’t end with accommodations. Many airlines have specials on flights to major Montana cities in the spring and fall.  Also, as the summer and winter crowds begin to dwindle, many of the area vendors will run specials just to stay competitive. Even the convention and visitor bureaus offer incentives for conferences and meetings during the shoulder seasons. Take advantage of these deals and your Montana meeting will be the one nobody forgets.

Unique, Local Events
Montana is no longer the well-kept secret it used to be. That’s great news for local and unique cultural events that can accompany your conference or meeting. If April is your month, attendees could participate in the International Wildlife Film Festival in Missoula. September features the Dragon Boat races on Flathead Lake. How about a pow wow or rodeo in late May, or a concert at a local brewery or riverside amphitheater? As destination meetings struggle to stay relevant in our digital world, making an authentic connection with a place is essential to the success of your meeting and ensures your attendees will return year after year.

Glacier peaks watching over Flathead Lake.

Meetings Northwest and MNW Destinations
Do you need a sixth reason to plan your conference, meeting or event in Montana? Meetings Northwest and MNW Destinations is now here to help. We plan conferences all over the country, but we’ve added a full service Destination Management Company to our portfolio. We have offices in the Flathead Valley (covering Glacier National Park, Whitefish and Flathead Lake), Missoula and Bozeman (covering Yellowstone National Park and Big Sky). We specialize in helping companies and associations pull off the perfect Montana meeting.

For more information on Meetings Northwest or MNW Destinations contact Amy at alucke@meetingsnorthwest.com

Amy Lucke, Conference & Event Planning/Destination Management

About the author: Amy has been lucky to call Montana home for almost her entire life.  Growing up in Missoula fostered her love for hiking mountains and floating rivers.  Her best memories are summer days spent just north on Flathead Lake and one of the reasons she now calls the Flathead Valley home.

She simply loves sharing the secrets of Northwest Montana’s mountain towns, outdoor adventures and of course the magic of Glacier National Park.  She started in events as a recruiter and admissions representative for The University of Montana and has now worked for clients all over the country as an event planner with Meetings Northwest.  Her favorite events are the ones in her neck of the woods.

13 NONSTOP FLIGHTS TO WESTERN MONTANA’S GLACIER COUNTRY

Getting to Montana has never been easier. With the increase in passenger demand for the treasure state and some of the larger airlines now offering direct-flight access into Western Montana as a travel destination from their main hubs, the time is right to visit and see for yourself why they call it Big Sky Country.

Fly direct from Dallas and Chicago to MSO on American Airlines. Photo: American Airlines

Western Montana’s Glacier Country offers ease of accessibility via two bustling regional airports, Glacier Park International (FCA), located in Kalispell, and Missoula International (MSO), located in Missoula. Whether you are a meeting planner looking for a relatively undiscovered mountain destination or an association needing convention space near an international airport, we’ve got you covered in Missoula, Kalispell and Whitefish. For tour operators with clients who have Glacier National Park on their bucket list, cut your clients’ time on a motor coach and consider flying into one of our regional airports before jumping on a coach to see the sites.

A picture perfect day at Saint Mary Lake in Glacier National Park.

Historic red bus tours in Glacier National Park.

Six major airlines (United, Delta, Alaska, American, Allegiant and Frontier) provide service between these airports, with a combined 13 nonstop flights (some seasonal) to major cities including Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas/Fort Worth, Denver, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Oakland, Phoenix/Mesa, Portland, Salt Lake City, San Francisco and Seattle, offering flight schedules that make planning your next conference or tour in Western Montana’s Glacier Country a breeze.

Enjoy western hospitality. Photo: Triple Creek Ranch

Choose from unique to conventional meeting spaces.

If attendees or clients are not located in one of these direct flight markets, not to worry; it’s a short flight from most hubs on these major airlines. To learn how simple it is to get to Western Montana, find out more.

Come see the Milky Way in big sky country.

For more information on meeting facilities in Western Montana, visit our Glacier Country meetings website. For more information on tour itinerary options, visit our Glacier Country tour operator’s website. If you need additional information, drop me a line; I’m always here to help.

See you in Montana,

DP

ONE DAY IN GLACIER NATIONAL PARK

As the Tourism Sales Manager for Western Montana’s Glacier Country, one of the questions that I get asked quite often is “I only have one day to spend in Glacier National Park, how should I spend the day?” While I highly recommend visitors take at least two or three days to really see the park, I know that they are usually on a tight itinerary so here are some of the top “must-dos” with limited time in Glacier National Park.

Wild Goose Island, Saint Mary Lake.

Drive the Going-to-the-Sun Road
If you only have one day in Glacier National Park, you’re well-advised to spend it exploring the Going-to-the-Sun Road. If you are entering the park from the west entrance be sure to stop in West Glacier for gas, a souvenir and any snacks you might want for the day. (If entering from the east side, get your provisions at St. Mary before entering the park.) Once you’re inside the park, make a stop in Apgar Village, peruse the various offerings at the Montana House (open year-round) before taking in the view from the southern end of Lake McDonald (aka, the most photographed spot in the park). After dipping your toes in the lake, travel along the Going-to-the-Sun Road to St. Mary. Take advantage of the various pull-outs and scenic view points along the way. Recommended stops include Trail of the Cedars, Logan Pass Visitor Center, Jackson Glacier Overlook, Sunrift Gorge and Sun Point.

Lake McDonald splendor.

Take a Red Bus Tour or Sun Tour
If you don’t have your own car to drive or just want to receive a fun and informative history lesson, reserve a seat on a historic red bus tour. It’s a fantastic way to take in the sights and sounds of the park. The driver is your tour guide and is called a Jammer. Back in the 1930’s the drivers would have to jam the gears to get the reds to climb the hills on the Going-to-the-Sun Road. All the reds have been upgraded, but the drivers have kept the name and dress in historic clothing and can tell you all about the flora and fauna in Glacier National Park. The reds are operated by and can be reserved through Glacier National Park Lodges. If you reserve seats on the most popular morning tour called Western Alpine, you will be back in time for lunch at Lake McDonald Lodge. Another option and a truly memorable experience, is Sun Tours where you will get the Blackfeet Indian perspective on what Glacier National Park meant to the Blackfeet Nation, and the beautiful land known as The Backbone of the World.

Red bus tours in Glacier National Park.

Dining at Lake McDonald Lodge
After your return trip from your Going-to-the-Sun experience, visit Lake McDonald Lodge. Built in 1913, the 82-room historic lodge sits on the edge of Lake McDonald. The front of the lodge—which actually faces the water—was built this way to greet the tourist that would come via rail and then steamship up the lake back in the early 1900’s. Step inside the Swiss Chalet designed lodge and choose to eat at Russell’s Fireside Dining Room or Jammer Joe’s Grill and Pizzeria.

Lake McDonald Lodge.

Take a Historic Boat Ride
After lunch, grab a seat on the DeSmet (advance reservations highly recommended) with Glacier Park Boat Company. Climb aboard the historic vessel just steps below Lake McDonald Lodge. Cruise the pristine water and listen to the captain or one of the Park Rangers provide commentary on the scenic tour. Boat tours are offered on five lakes in Glacier National Park including St. Mary Lake, Lake Josephine, Swiftcurrent Lake and Two Medicine Lake.

Cruise among the peaks in Glacier National Park.

Take a Hike
Known as a hiker’s paradise, your time in Glacier National Park would not be complete without a hike into the forest. The park offers 730 miles of trails for every age and fitness level from the novice to the highly skilled back-country hiker. One of the most popular hikes is the mile-long Trail of the Cedars (which is ADA accessible) followed by the 4.5-mile round-trip hike to Avalanche Lake. If going with a guide is more your style, Glacier Guides offers well trained guides to lead the way and explain the geology, history and more.

Pro tip: If hiking in Glacier, always be bear aware and never hike alone, make noise, never leave food out, observe bears from a safe distance and carry bear spay as a precaution.

A portion of over 730 miles of hiking trails.

Additional Options For the more adventurous take a horseback trail ride with Swan Mountain Outfitters from their Apgar or Lake McDonald corrals. For a thrilling adventure in late spring and early summer—at the height of mountain runoff—take a whitewater rafting trip with one of the many outfitters in Glacier Country.

For more information visit our tour operator website. If you need additional tour itinerary assistance, feel free to drop me a line; I’m always here to help.

Happy Exploring,
DP

TOP 5 REASONS TO CHOOSE WESTERN MONTANA FOR YOUR MOUNTAIN MEETING

Meeting planners know that inspiring destinations generate inspired ideas. Whether it’s the fresh mountain air, the outdoor activities or the soaring altitude, planners often say meetings held in the mountains are the most productive meetings. With that in mind, I would like to introduce our venues here in Western Montana’s Glacier Country that offer spectacular settings for your next meeting or event, whether it’s a larger conference in Missoula with mountain views in every directions or a board retreat at a mountainside lodge atop Big Mountain at Whitefish Mountain Resort.

Sunrise at Many Glacier Hotel in Glacier National Park.

Sunrise at Many Glacier Hotel in Glacier National Park.

Here are the top 5 reasons to hold your next meeting in the Rocky Mountains of Western Montana.

1. Stunning Scenery. If you’re looking for snow-covered peaks, look no further than Glacier Country and our bevy of  mountain ranges including the Mission, Swan, Cabinet, Whitefish, Flathead, Purcell, Bitterroot and Sapphire mountains, as well as the stunning peaks in Glacier National Park. In the spring, feast your eyes on blankets of mountainside wildflowers and the breathtaking bear grass that flowers every five to seven years. The fall offers an array of red, orange and yellow hues and Montana’s tamarack trees—also known as the western larch—are stunning in autumn. The majestic views of Big Sky Country in the summer are something to behold and we’re certain that stargazing at Montana’s star-filled night skies (with little to no light pollution) are something attendees will talk about long after the meeting is over.

Tamarack trees in autumn.

Tamarack trees in autumn.

Snow-capped peaks of the Mission Mountains.

Snow-capped peaks of the Mission Mountains.

2. Unique Lodging and Conference Options. The lodging and conference venues in Western Montana range from charming hot spring resorts to mountainside lodges and larger branded hotels and conference centers to rustic lakeside guest ranches. Western Montana’s Glacier Country is also home to three of Montana’s luxury guest ranches and a prime destination for corporate incentive meetings and retreats (read more about those here.

Rejuvenating pools at Quinn’s Hot Springs.

Rejuvenating pools at Quinn’s Hot Springs.

Mountainside lodging at Whitefish Mountain Resort.

Mountainside lodging at Whitefish Mountain Resort.

3. Networking Opportunities. Because of the relaxed environment—the nature and scenery that surrounds them—attendees are able to relax and be more productive in thoughts and ideas. Without the big-city sights and sounds to draw their attention and time, people usually stay and network at the self-contained mountain destination. This allows for an increase in networking, bonding and a better exchange of idea that leaves your meeting attendees very satisfied with the mountain meeting experience. Volunteering has become a big part of meetings and is another way to bond and network, all while giving back to the community where the meeting is held.

Networking lakeside, Montana style.

Networking lakeside, Montana style.

Volunteering at a Montana state park while at a conference.

Volunteering at a Montana state park while at a conference.

4. Team-Building Opportunities. Few settings can match the mountains: the terrain found in Montana offers unimaginable variety all four seasons of the year. At Whitefish Mountain Resort, the summer months offer opportunities for teamwork and team bonding while having fun at the Aerial Adventure Park, an obstacle course that sits among the trees and off the ground at the resort.  Or paddle as a team as you maneuver your raft through the rapids on the Middle Fork of the Flathead River near Glacier National Park or the Alberton Gorge near Missoula. At Flathead Lake Lodge in Bigfork, team competitions take place with dummy steer roping, canoe racing and cocktail making.

Canoe racing competition on Flathead Lake.

Canoe racing competition on Flathead Lake.

Hiking to the M above Missoula for a team selfie.

5. Accessibility and Affordability. With two international airports in Western Montana—Missoula International Airport located in Missoula and Glacier Park International Airport located in Kalispell and only 20 minutes from both Whitefish and Glacier National Park—along with increased air service and decreasing ticket prices, getting here for that spectacular mountain meeting is easy. Historically, spring and fall have been the prime meeting and conference seasons which fits perfectly with Western Montana’s shoulder seasons, offering great rates and plenty of availability. Choose to stay in the charming mountain town of Whitefish (more on meeting in Whitefish here) or the regional shopping hub of Kalispell (more on meeting in Kalispell here) or the 2nd largest city and cultural hub of Montana, Missoula (more on meeting in Missoula here).

The charming mountain town of Whitefish, with world-class skiing at Whitefish Mountain Resort. Photo Explore Whitefish

The charming mountain town of Whitefish, with world-class skiing at Whitefish Mountain Resort. Photo Explore Whitefish

The bustling town of Kalispell, and the shopping hub of the Flathead Valley. Photo Donnie Sexton

The bustling town of Kalispell, and the shopping hub of the Flathead Valley. Photo Donnie Sexton

The cultural hub of Montana, Missoula is home to the University of Montana.

The cultural hub of Montana, Missoula is home to the University of Montana.

For more information on meeting facilities in Western Montana, visit our Glacier Country meetings website. Or, if you need help locating the perfect mountain destination for your meeting in Western Montana, drop me a line; I’m always here to help.

Meet in Montana,

DP

Explore Glacier National Park’s Winter Wonderland

Meeting in Montana is an unforgettable experience, and while most destination meetings take place during the spring and fall seasons, our secret season of splendor is actually winter. If your group is headed to the area for a meeting or retreat during this magical time, then adding in a spectacular off-site outing is just the thing to make a trip here unforgettable.

This view of Lake McDonald in Glacier National Park will never get old.

If you’re curious about off-site activities (that are easy enough for all attendees to participate in), it should be noted that our region boasts one of the most beautiful places in the world: Glacier National Park. It’s no secret that Glacier National Park is absolutely jaw-dropping during the summer months, but the park is even more amazing during winter. While July and August are the most popular times to visit, the park is open year-round, and each season provides its own distinct experience within the Crown of the Continent. Plus, winter is one of the most peaceful times to visit the park. This time of year offers snow lovers quietude, and some of the most pristine Montana powder. Because of the small crowds, it feels like the park is your own personal playground. Bringing your clients to Montana during the winter season provides them with an unforgettable experience. Here are some of the best ways to explore Glacier National Park’s winter wonderland.

Snowshoeing

For a serene winter experience, strap on a pair of snowshoes and explore Glacier National Park’s Lake McDonald Valley. During winter (January – March), the National Park Service offers free ranger-led tours on Saturdays and Sundays. Suitable for varying ages and abilities, these walks encourage participants to search for signs of wildlife and discover plants and animals that call the park home. In addition, the Going-to-the-Sun Road, the shores of Lake McDonald and the trail system at Marias Pass offer prime snowshoeing. For guided tours and a truly local outdoor experience, chat with our friends at Glacier Adventure Guides. They will be happy to cater to your group’s needs.

Snowshoeing the Going-to-the-Sun Road is an unforgettable experience.

 

Cross-Country Skiing

One of the best ways to explore the snow-covered Going-to-the-Sun Road is cross-country skiing. During the winter, most of the road is closed to vehicular travel and snowfall creates a sanctuary for cross-country skiing. The road is plowed from the west entrance to Lake McDonald Lodge, and snow lovers can access the road just past the lodge. Start your morning with a meeting and then set off on a tour to explore this incredible winter wonder.

Family enjoying a day of cross-country skiing in Glacier National Park.

The views when cross-country skiing are absolute perfection during winter in Glacier National Park. Photo: Emily Hall

After spending the day playing in the park, we suggest visiting the Izaak Walton Inn to warm up with delicious comfort food and local Montana spirits. You’ll be glad you did.

For more information on meetings and group activities in Western Montana, visit our Glacier Country Tour Operators website or, if you need planning assistance, reach out to us directly. We’re always happy to help.

Happy exploring!